Nest of Pirates

Nest of Pirates: Piracy and the Formalization of the First British Empire

On October 20 from 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Professor Mark G. Hanna will speak about “Nest of Pirates:  Pirates and the Formalization of the First British empire” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.

Pirates are described in both popular culture and historical scholarship as inherently removed from civilized society–in rebellion with social norms and hierarchies.  Lawyers of the seventeenth century certainly promoted this impression by defining pirates as hostis humani generis, enemies of mankind.  This talk will describe how pirates during most of the early modern period were actually actively welcomed and supported on the peripheries of what would become the first British Empire.  Contrary to our common perceptions, many pirates bought land, married local women, and even became members of the ruling elite in North American colonial communities.

Mark G. Hanna is an assistant professor of history at the University of California in San Diego.  He was a National Endowment for the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture from the fall of 2008 to the spring of 2010.  Professor Hanna received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University in 2006. He received outside graduate fellowships from the Center for New World Comparative Studies at the John Carter Brown Library, the W. M. Keck Foundation at the Huntington Library, and postdoctoral fellowships from the Mark DeWolfe Howe Fund from the Harvard University Law School, a William Nelson Cromwell Fellowship from the American Society for Legal History, and an Arthur H. Cole Grant from the Economic History Association. Dr. Hanna’s dissertation, “The Pirate Nests: The Impact of Piracy on Newport and Charles Town, 1670-1730,” not only challenges prevailing interpretations of piracy; it also uses the phenomenon of piracy to illuminate the history of early America in the Atlantic World. His research is quintessentially multidisciplinary, with a legal historical base grounded in the Navigation Acts, early trials from the Admiralty courts, and shipping records; an interdisciplinary historical analysis of the economic underpinnings, social networks, and political support of pirate activity on land and sea; and the cultural nuance of print culture, both the literary world of historical fiction and the more ephemeral rough-and-tumble of early newspapers.

No RSVP.  Refreshments will be served!

Swing by at 12:00 pm on October 20th, to hear Scott Paulson from the Arts Library play pirate tunes on the carillon!

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Memories of Kristallnacht and Beyond: Five Years Forced Labor

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Memories of Kristallnacht and Beyond: Five Years Forced Labor

When the Nazis unleashed the pogrom that came to be known as Kristallnacht (Crystal Night), Gerhard Maschkowski was barely fourteen years old.  The son of a WW I veteran blinded in combat, Gerhard grew up in West Prussian Elbing where he experienced prejudice and persecution firsthand. In the wake of Kristallnacht, he spent several stints in the forced labor camps of Jessenmühle and Neuendorf. From here he was deported to Auschwitz-Monowitz where he worked variously in a cement and an electricians’ detachment. After barely surviving a grueling death march, he ended up in a hospital in Breslau, which the Russians liberated in early May 1945. In commemoration of the horrifying event that started it all (Nov. 9, 1938), Maschkowski will share the impact these events have had on his life.

Professor Richard Biernacki offers some introductory remarks from the perspective of the sociologist.

When: Wednesday Nov. 9, 2011, 5-7 pm

Where: UCSD Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Who: Free and Open to the Public – Refreshments Provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Swimming Upstream

Swimming Upstream in the University of Life

Jameelah X. Medina
Jameelah X. Medina, M. Ed., contributor to I Speak for Myself: American Women on Being Muslim, will talk about her experiences as a third-generation African American Muslim in mainstream society and in the Muslim community, before and post-9/11, with the focus on the shift that has taken place after 9/11. She will also discuss her experiences with post-9/11 airport culture and the politics of the headscarf in that space.

Thursday, September 22, 2011
12:00 – 1:00 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building
UC San Diego

I Speak for Myself

Book signing after the event.
Copies available for $15
Cash preferred

Refreshments will be served.
No RSVP

sponsored by: The Librarians Association of UCSD Committee on Diversity

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Under the Shadow of the Holocaust

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Under the Shadow of the Holocaust: a Hungarian Woman in Auschwitz

Agathe Ehrenfried grew up in Rakosliget, Hungary. She was twenty-one years old when, in 1944, the Germans occupied her country and soon after began rounding up the Jews. Over the course of the next twelve months Ehrenfried passed through several concentration camps including Auschwitz-Birkenau and Plaszow (Krakow), an experience that will forever be etched in her mind. Today, Ehrenfried speaks about her traumatic past at schools and stresses the need to keep “the flame of memory” alive.  Agathe Ehrenfried will be introduced by Phyllis Epstein, a local philanthropist and community leader who is actively involved in the Shoah Foundation Institute.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Printing Changes Coming

Printing change coming!

Starting July 25, the ACMS computers in the Geisel Library will print to the Imprints IACCESS printing system that’s in use at other library computers as well as photocopiers.

We will not have ACMS printing in the libraries anymore.  This includes the 1st floor “tunnel” lab as well as the Science & Engineering lab and InfoCommons area.

If you haven’t used IACCESS before, your UCSD photo ID card is your printing card.   You can find out more about printing with this system at the Libraries’ Printing and Copying page

If you have money left in an ACMS printing account, you can still use it at other ACMS labs with printing.  The closest ones are in the Price Center.

If you have any questions about printing in the libraries, please ask a library staff member or stop by the Imprints service window.

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The Spirit Never Dies

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Dr. Edith Eger:  The Spirit Never Dies

Edith Eger

Edith Eger

Dr. Edith Eger was born in Kosice, Czechoslovakia. As a girl Edith loved to dance. Her training  came in handy when, at sixteen, she was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Asked to perform in front of the infamous camp physician Dr. Mengele, Edith closed her eyes and imagined that she was Juliet in Tchaikovsky’s fantasy overture Romeo and Juliet.  After the war, she moved to the United States and became a clinical psychologist with her own practice in La Jolla. A popular motivational speaker, Dr. Eger has talked to many audiences including the prime minister of New Zealand and Oprah Winfrey. She will be introduced by Armin Owzar, a visiting history professor from Germany, who opens the talk with some reflections on the broader historical context of her ordeal.<

Wednesday, June 1, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Malaita, Solomon Islands: A Survey of Religious Movements

Malaita, Solomon Islands: A Survey of Religious Movements

On Friday, May 20, 2011 at 3:00pm Right Rev. Dr. Terry M. Brown will speak about “Malaita, Solomon Islands:  A Survey of Religious Movements” in Room 276 the Geisel Library building.

Although the languages and cultures of Malaita share a high degree of unity, the island’s religious life is fractured and fractious: Schisms, consolidations, political aspirations, and divides between urban and rural practices are all part of the Malaitan religious landscape.

Dr. Brown, who served from 1996 to 2008 as the Bishop of Malaita, Anglican Church of Melanesia, will present a summary of his research on the complex religious movements and groups on Malaita, along with a discussion on the wide variety of typologies employed in his work.

Refreshments will be served.  Open to the public.  No RSVP is necessary.

Sponsored by the Melanesian Archive.  Questions? Please contact Kathy Creely (kcreely@ucsd.edu)

Parking: Parking officers DO CHECK weekdays until 11pm. Metered/hourly parking is available on Hopkins Lane, or in the Hopkins Parking Structure (on the corner of Hopkins & Voight Drive).  Campus  parking office: (858) 534-4223.

Campus map: http://maps.ucsd.edu/Acrobat/MainCampus.pdf OR http://www-act.ucsd.edu/maps/

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Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

On Thursday, May 26, 2011 from 12-1 pm Yen Le Espiritu will speak about “Body Counts:  The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.

lê thi diem thúy, the author of The Gangster We Are All Looking For, describes Vietnamese refugees as a “people larger than their life situation.”  Drawing on lê’s novel, Yen Le Espiritu explores how the oft-strained family relations among Vietnamese refugees are not simply a private family matter, but a social, historical, and transnational affair. In telling their own stories, Vietnamese in the United States have created alternative memories and epistemologies that unsettle and challenge the established public narratives of the Vietnam War and Vietnamese people.

lê thi diem thúy’s novel, The Gangster We Are All Looking For, was the 2011 One Book, One San Diego selection.

Yen Le Espiritu received her Ph.D. from UC Los Angeles in 1990. She is a professor and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD. Focusing on Asian America, her research has sought to challenge the homogeneous descriptions of communities of color and the narrowness of mutually exclusive binaries by attending to generational, ethnic, class, and gender variations within constructed racial categories. In particular, her work has called attention to the ways in which racialized ethnicity is relational rather than atomized and discrete and the ways in which group identities necessarily form through interaction with other groups “through complicated experiences of conflict and cooperation” and in structural contexts of power.

Refreshments will be served.  Open to the public.  No RSVP is necessary.

Parking: Parking officers DO CHECK weekdays until 11pm. Metered/hourly parking is available on Hopkins Lane, or in the Hopkins Parking Structure (on the corner of Hopkins & Voight Drive).  Campus  parking office: (858) 534-4223.

Campus map: http://maps.ucsd.edu/Acrobat/MainCampus.pdf OR http://www-act.ucsd.edu/maps/

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Own Your Impact! Earth Week 2011

The UC San Diego Libraries are ready to celebrate Earth Week 2011.  Check out some of the events we’re participating in:

The Green Open House, Saturday, April 16, 9 am – 3 pm, Library Walk
Look for the Libraries on the Sustainability Walking Tours. These 45-minute tours will highlight some of the innovations and business practices that have led to UC San Diego being named one of the greenest universities in the nation. Stops will showcase a green dorm room, water-wise landscaping, campus’ energy operations, Sustainability Resource Center and much more.

Food Fight, a Documentary, Monday, April 18, 5:30 – 8 pm, Price Center Theater
Look for the Libraries at the informational tabling event during the hors d’ouvres section.  Stick around to check out the documentary and panel discussion after.

Learn at Lunch, Tuesday, April 19, 12 – 1 pm, Seuss Room in the Geisel Library Building
The UC San Diego Libraries’ Environmental Sustainability Group will host a learn-at-lunch talk that will focus on the sustainability projects that are under way in the Libraries and around campus. Also featured will be the Green Campus Program Interns, a student group funded by the Alliance to Save Energy, and Campus Facilities Management.  Come hear about green projects on campus, including green features of the Geisel library, and how UCSD is building a sustainable future.

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From Tajikistan to the Moon

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Robert Frimtzis: From Tajikistan to the Moon

Originally from Beltz in Bessarabia (today’s Moldova), Robert Frimtzis was ten years old when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. To escape persectution, the family fled eastward to remote Tajikistan. After the war he ended up in a Displaced Persons camp in Cremona, Italy. Barely 19, Robert immigrated to the United States, where he earned a Master’s Degree in engineering and was part of NASA’s Apollo program. His memoirs, From Tajikistan to the Moon (available at the UCSD Libraries), were published in 2008.  He will be introduced by Professor Amelia Glaser, Acting Director of the Soviet and Russian Studies Program. Her introduction will provide some essential historical background to Robert’s unusual experience.

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

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