Amos Oz: Life & Letters

amos oz banner

Amos Oz, one of Israel’s most distinguished novelists and public intellectuals.  Oz, 73, is the author of 18 books and more than 400 articles and essays in Hebrew, with translations of his work into some 40 languages, including Arabic. The recipient of numerous awards for his literature and for his peace activism, Oz is also a professor of literature at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Be’er Sheva. His autobiographical novel “A Tale of Love and Darkness” is an international bestseller and has been honored with 10 different prizes around the world. A film based on the novel is expected to begin production later this year. Most recently, he co-authored “Jews and Words” with his daughter Fania Oz-Salzberger, in which they argue that what unites the Jewish people, more than blood or belief, are sacred and secular texts.

“The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a clash of right and right,” Oz recently told the New York Times. “Tragedies are resolved in one of two ways: The Shakespearian way or the Anton Chekhov way. In a tragedy by Shakespeare, the stage at the end is littered with dead bodies. In a tragedy by Chekhov everyone is unhappy, bitter, disillusioned and melancholy but they are alive. My colleagues in the peace movement and I are working for a Chekhovian not a Shakespearian conclusion.”

Among his many awards and honors, Oz has received the Legion of Honour of France, the Goethe Prize, the French Prix Femina, the Frankfurt Peace Prize, the National Jewish Book Award, the Primo Levi prize, the Prince of Asturias Award in Literature, the Heinrich Heine Prize, and the Israel Prize.

The UC San Diego Library to excited to present an exhibit, “Amos Oz: Life and Letters,” from April 17 through June 10.  The exhibit, in the west wing of Geisel Library’s main floor, will take Oz’s “A Tale of Love and Darkness” as a springing-off point to consider the author’s life and writings, Israeli literature, and Israeli/Palestinian history and politics. Specific exhibit areas include: Oz’s early life and family history; his literary influences and the writers he has influenced; and the development of modern Hebrew as a literary language.

The Library also created a guide to help locate his books in our collections, along with suggesting resources for those interested in more in-depth research: http://libguides.ucsd.edu/amosoz

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Sam Horowitz: Hiding from the Nazis

The Holocaust Living History Workshop presents:

Sam Horowitz: Hiding from the Nazis

ghetto of lublin

Nazi Soldiers Discovering Jews Hiding in a Cellar

Sam Horowitz was born in Lopatyn, Poland, today Ukraine. When the Nazis came, he was among the many Jews herded into ghettos. About to be deported to a concentration camp, the family managed to escape. In the dead of night, they trekked back to their village where a Ukrainian farmer took them in. They remained in hiding until the end of the war. After several years in Vienna and Munich, Horowitz immigrated to the US.

Horowitz will share the story of his incredible escape. He will be introduced by UCSD history professor Deborah Hertz, a specialist in modern Jewish and German history.

When: Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 5 – 7 pm

Where: UCSD Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Who: Free and Open to the Public – Refreshments Provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Michael Bart: The Partisans of Vilna

The Holocaust Living History Workshop presents:

Michael Bart: The Partisans of Vilna

Until Our Last Breath

To honor this year’s Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom Ha-Shoah), Michael Bart shares the incredible story of his parents Zenia Lewinson and Leizer Bart who were both members of the Lithuanian partisan group “The Avengers.” Under the leadership of the Zionist Abba Kovner, they vowed to resist the Nazis “until our last breath” – the title of Bart’s award-winning book about the Vilna partisans. At this special event Bart relates the struggle of his parents and talks about his own ten-year-long journey to recover their history.

When: Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 5 – 7 pm

Where: UCSD Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Who: Free and Open to the Public – Refreshments Provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Cesar Chavez 2012

Los Peregrinos: A photography exhibit

Photographer Ricardo Garcia-Trejo describes his exhibit:

On March 31st, 1994, approximately 85 United Farm Workers and their supporters gathered together at a site known as “Forty Acres,” just two miles west of Delano, CA. They christened themselves “Peregrinos” and donned wooden crosses with black ribbons around their necks. Then they began an arduous 330 mile pilgrimage over a twenty four day period, recreating the historic 1966 UFW march from Delano to Sacramento inaugurated by their recently deceased leader Cesar Chavez.

April 2 – 30
Geisel Library, 1st Floor, West Wing,  Collaborative Study Space (map)

For a recommended list of films related to Cesar Chavez, see libraries.ucsd.edu/locations/sshl/_files/pdf/chavez film list.pdf.

For more 2012 César E. Chávez events: http://blink.ucsd.edu/go/chavez
Additional photographs on display at the Cross-cultural Center Art Gallery (2nd Floor, Price Center East)

Sponsors: UCSD Chicano/Latino Staff Association, César E. Chávez Planning Committee, and the Librarians’ Association of UCSD Committee on Diversity

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International Education Week 2011

International Education Week 2011

Visit the UC San Diego Libraries’ International Education Week display in the Geisel Library building. International Education Week is from November 14 through the 18th. In addition to interesting facts and statistics, UC San Diego students and visiting international students share their study abroad experiences. The display also highlights materials (both print and online) that can help you explore international education opportunities and learn about other countries and cultures– http://libguides.ucsd.edu/iew

International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. The week is dedicated to enhancing international awareness across the UC San Diego campus as well as to reinforcing the importance of the exchange of students and scholars across borders. For more events on campus—  http://iew.ucsd.edu/iew/calendar.html

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Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego

Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego

On November 2nd from Noon-1pm, join authors and political scientists Steven Erie and Vladimir Kogan as they discuss their new book “Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.


News release for the event

The 21st century has not been kind to California’s reputation for good government. But the Golden State’s governance flaws reflect worrisome national trends with origins in the 1970s and 1980s. Growing voter distrust with government, a demand for services but not taxes to pay for them, a sharp decline in enlightened leadership, and dysfunctional political institutions have all contributed to the current malaise.

Until recently, San Diego—America’s 8th largest city—seemed immune to such systematic governance disorders. This sunny beach town entered the 1980s proclaiming itself “America’s Finest City,” but in a few short years had become known as “Enron-by-the-Sea.” In an eye-opening presentation, the authors will mix policy analysis, political theory, and history to explore and explain the unintended but largely predictable failures of governance in San Diego. Benchmarking San Diego with other leading California cities, Paradise Plundered examines critical dimensions of San Diego’s governance failure, including intractable pension and budget deficits, poorly crafted public-private partnerships, and much more. This tale of civic woe offers valuable lessons for urban scholars, practitioners, and general readers concerned about the future of their own cities.

Steven P. Erie is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Urban Studies and Planning Program, UC, San Diego. Vladimir Kogan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at UC, San Diego.

The authors will be signing copies of their book after the presentation.

The event is sponsored by the Social Sciences & Humanities Library, the Urban Studies & Planning Program, the Urban Studies Program Student Club, and the Center for Community Well-Being.

No RSVP. Light refreshments will be served.

Paradise Plundered Book Cover

Memories of Kristallnacht and Beyond: Five Years Forced Labor

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Memories of Kristallnacht and Beyond: Five Years Forced Labor

When the Nazis unleashed the pogrom that came to be known as Kristallnacht (Crystal Night), Gerhard Maschkowski was barely fourteen years old.  The son of a WW I veteran blinded in combat, Gerhard grew up in West Prussian Elbing where he experienced prejudice and persecution firsthand. In the wake of Kristallnacht, he spent several stints in the forced labor camps of Jessenmühle and Neuendorf. From here he was deported to Auschwitz-Monowitz where he worked variously in a cement and an electricians’ detachment. After barely surviving a grueling death march, he ended up in a hospital in Breslau, which the Russians liberated in early May 1945. In commemoration of the horrifying event that started it all (Nov. 9, 1938), Maschkowski will share the impact these events have had on his life.

Professor Richard Biernacki offers some introductory remarks from the perspective of the sociologist.

When: Wednesday Nov. 9, 2011, 5-7 pm

Where: UCSD Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Who: Free and Open to the Public – Refreshments Provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

On Thursday, May 26, 2011 from 12-1 pm Yen Le Espiritu will speak about “Body Counts:  The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.

lê thi diem thúy, the author of The Gangster We Are All Looking For, describes Vietnamese refugees as a “people larger than their life situation.”  Drawing on lê’s novel, Yen Le Espiritu explores how the oft-strained family relations among Vietnamese refugees are not simply a private family matter, but a social, historical, and transnational affair. In telling their own stories, Vietnamese in the United States have created alternative memories and epistemologies that unsettle and challenge the established public narratives of the Vietnam War and Vietnamese people.

lê thi diem thúy’s novel, The Gangster We Are All Looking For, was the 2011 One Book, One San Diego selection.

Yen Le Espiritu received her Ph.D. from UC Los Angeles in 1990. She is a professor and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD. Focusing on Asian America, her research has sought to challenge the homogeneous descriptions of communities of color and the narrowness of mutually exclusive binaries by attending to generational, ethnic, class, and gender variations within constructed racial categories. In particular, her work has called attention to the ways in which racialized ethnicity is relational rather than atomized and discrete and the ways in which group identities necessarily form through interaction with other groups “through complicated experiences of conflict and cooperation” and in structural contexts of power.

Refreshments will be served.  Open to the public.  No RSVP is necessary.

Parking: Parking officers DO CHECK weekdays until 11pm. Metered/hourly parking is available on Hopkins Lane, or in the Hopkins Parking Structure (on the corner of Hopkins & Voight Drive).  Campus  parking office: (858) 534-4223.

Campus map: http://maps.ucsd.edu/Acrobat/MainCampus.pdf OR http://www-act.ucsd.edu/maps/

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From Tajikistan to the Moon

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Robert Frimtzis: From Tajikistan to the Moon

Originally from Beltz in Bessarabia (today’s Moldova), Robert Frimtzis was ten years old when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. To escape persectution, the family fled eastward to remote Tajikistan. After the war he ended up in a Displaced Persons camp in Cremona, Italy. Barely 19, Robert immigrated to the United States, where he earned a Master’s Degree in engineering and was part of NASA’s Apollo program. His memoirs, From Tajikistan to the Moon (available at the UCSD Libraries), were published in 2008.  He will be introduced by Professor Amelia Glaser, Acting Director of the Soviet and Russian Studies Program. Her introduction will provide some essential historical background to Robert’s unusual experience.

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Kiss Every Step

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Doris Martin: Kiss Every Step

Doris Martin, born and raised in Bedzin, Poland, was taken to Auschwitz at sixteen and from there to the Ludwigsdorf slave labor camp in Lower Silesia, a sub-camp of Gross-Rosen.  For almost 3 years she struggled against depravation, despair, and the ever-present threat of death.  After the war, Martin was too traumatized to talk about her horrifying experience.  With the help of her husband she finally committed her unique story to paper, the result of which was her book, Kiss Every Step (available at UCSD Libraries).  Martin will be introduced by Professor Deobrah Hertz, who considers her experience from the historian’s perspective.

Wednesday April 6th, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Doris Martin (far left) and her family, right after the war

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

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