Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego

Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego

On November 2nd from Noon-1pm, join authors and political scientists Steven Erie and Vladimir Kogan as they discuss their new book “Paradise Plundered: Fiscal Crisis and Governance Failures in San Diego” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.


News release for the event

The 21st century has not been kind to California’s reputation for good government. But the Golden State’s governance flaws reflect worrisome national trends with origins in the 1970s and 1980s. Growing voter distrust with government, a demand for services but not taxes to pay for them, a sharp decline in enlightened leadership, and dysfunctional political institutions have all contributed to the current malaise.

Until recently, San Diego—America’s 8th largest city—seemed immune to such systematic governance disorders. This sunny beach town entered the 1980s proclaiming itself “America’s Finest City,” but in a few short years had become known as “Enron-by-the-Sea.” In an eye-opening presentation, the authors will mix policy analysis, political theory, and history to explore and explain the unintended but largely predictable failures of governance in San Diego. Benchmarking San Diego with other leading California cities, Paradise Plundered examines critical dimensions of San Diego’s governance failure, including intractable pension and budget deficits, poorly crafted public-private partnerships, and much more. This tale of civic woe offers valuable lessons for urban scholars, practitioners, and general readers concerned about the future of their own cities.

Steven P. Erie is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Urban Studies and Planning Program, UC, San Diego. Vladimir Kogan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at UC, San Diego.

The authors will be signing copies of their book after the presentation.

The event is sponsored by the Social Sciences & Humanities Library, the Urban Studies & Planning Program, the Urban Studies Program Student Club, and the Center for Community Well-Being.

No RSVP. Light refreshments will be served.

Paradise Plundered Book Cover

Nest of Pirates

Nest of Pirates: Piracy and the Formalization of the First British Empire

On October 20 from 1:00 – 2:00 pm, Professor Mark G. Hanna will speak about “Nest of Pirates:  Pirates and the Formalization of the First British empire” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.

Pirates are described in both popular culture and historical scholarship as inherently removed from civilized society–in rebellion with social norms and hierarchies.  Lawyers of the seventeenth century certainly promoted this impression by defining pirates as hostis humani generis, enemies of mankind.  This talk will describe how pirates during most of the early modern period were actually actively welcomed and supported on the peripheries of what would become the first British Empire.  Contrary to our common perceptions, many pirates bought land, married local women, and even became members of the ruling elite in North American colonial communities.

Mark G. Hanna is an assistant professor of history at the University of California in San Diego.  He was a National Endowment for the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture from the fall of 2008 to the spring of 2010.  Professor Hanna received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University in 2006. He received outside graduate fellowships from the Center for New World Comparative Studies at the John Carter Brown Library, the W. M. Keck Foundation at the Huntington Library, and postdoctoral fellowships from the Mark DeWolfe Howe Fund from the Harvard University Law School, a William Nelson Cromwell Fellowship from the American Society for Legal History, and an Arthur H. Cole Grant from the Economic History Association. Dr. Hanna’s dissertation, “The Pirate Nests: The Impact of Piracy on Newport and Charles Town, 1670-1730,” not only challenges prevailing interpretations of piracy; it also uses the phenomenon of piracy to illuminate the history of early America in the Atlantic World. His research is quintessentially multidisciplinary, with a legal historical base grounded in the Navigation Acts, early trials from the Admiralty courts, and shipping records; an interdisciplinary historical analysis of the economic underpinnings, social networks, and political support of pirate activity on land and sea; and the cultural nuance of print culture, both the literary world of historical fiction and the more ephemeral rough-and-tumble of early newspapers.

No RSVP.  Refreshments will be served!

Swing by at 12:00 pm on October 20th, to hear Scott Paulson from the Arts Library play pirate tunes on the carillon!

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Swimming Upstream

Swimming Upstream in the University of Life

Jameelah X. Medina
Jameelah X. Medina, M. Ed., contributor to I Speak for Myself: American Women on Being Muslim, will talk about her experiences as a third-generation African American Muslim in mainstream society and in the Muslim community, before and post-9/11, with the focus on the shift that has taken place after 9/11. She will also discuss her experiences with post-9/11 airport culture and the politics of the headscarf in that space.

Thursday, September 22, 2011
12:00 – 1:00 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building
UC San Diego

I Speak for Myself

Book signing after the event.
Copies available for $15
Cash preferred

Refreshments will be served.
No RSVP

sponsored by: The Librarians Association of UCSD Committee on Diversity

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Under the Shadow of the Holocaust

The Holocaust Living Workshop presents:

Under the Shadow of the Holocaust: a Hungarian Woman in Auschwitz

Agathe Ehrenfried grew up in Rakosliget, Hungary. She was twenty-one years old when, in 1944, the Germans occupied her country and soon after began rounding up the Jews. Over the course of the next twelve months Ehrenfried passed through several concentration camps including Auschwitz-Birkenau and Plaszow (Krakow), an experience that will forever be etched in her mind. Today, Ehrenfried speaks about her traumatic past at schools and stresses the need to keep “the flame of memory” alive.  Agathe Ehrenfried will be introduced by Phyllis Epstein, a local philanthropist and community leader who is actively involved in the Shoah Foundation Institute.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 5 -7 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library Building, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public.
Refreshments provided!

For more information contact the Program Coordinator, Susanne Hillman at hlhw@ucsd.edu or 858-534-7661.

Malaita, Solomon Islands: A Survey of Religious Movements

Malaita, Solomon Islands: A Survey of Religious Movements

On Friday, May 20, 2011 at 3:00pm Right Rev. Dr. Terry M. Brown will speak about “Malaita, Solomon Islands:  A Survey of Religious Movements” in Room 276 the Geisel Library building.

Although the languages and cultures of Malaita share a high degree of unity, the island’s religious life is fractured and fractious: Schisms, consolidations, political aspirations, and divides between urban and rural practices are all part of the Malaitan religious landscape.

Dr. Brown, who served from 1996 to 2008 as the Bishop of Malaita, Anglican Church of Melanesia, will present a summary of his research on the complex religious movements and groups on Malaita, along with a discussion on the wide variety of typologies employed in his work.

Refreshments will be served.  Open to the public.  No RSVP is necessary.

Sponsored by the Melanesian Archive.  Questions? Please contact Kathy Creely (kcreely@ucsd.edu)

Parking: Parking officers DO CHECK weekdays until 11pm. Metered/hourly parking is available on Hopkins Lane, or in the Hopkins Parking Structure (on the corner of Hopkins & Voight Drive).  Campus  parking office: (858) 534-4223.

Campus map: http://maps.ucsd.edu/Acrobat/MainCampus.pdf OR http://www-act.ucsd.edu/maps/

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Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

Body Counts: The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories

On Thursday, May 26, 2011 from 12-1 pm Yen Le Espiritu will speak about “Body Counts:  The Vietnam War, the Refugees, and the Writing of Ghost Stories” in the Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building.

lê thi diem thúy, the author of The Gangster We Are All Looking For, describes Vietnamese refugees as a “people larger than their life situation.”  Drawing on lê’s novel, Yen Le Espiritu explores how the oft-strained family relations among Vietnamese refugees are not simply a private family matter, but a social, historical, and transnational affair. In telling their own stories, Vietnamese in the United States have created alternative memories and epistemologies that unsettle and challenge the established public narratives of the Vietnam War and Vietnamese people.

lê thi diem thúy’s novel, The Gangster We Are All Looking For, was the 2011 One Book, One San Diego selection.

Yen Le Espiritu received her Ph.D. from UC Los Angeles in 1990. She is a professor and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UCSD. Focusing on Asian America, her research has sought to challenge the homogeneous descriptions of communities of color and the narrowness of mutually exclusive binaries by attending to generational, ethnic, class, and gender variations within constructed racial categories. In particular, her work has called attention to the ways in which racialized ethnicity is relational rather than atomized and discrete and the ways in which group identities necessarily form through interaction with other groups “through complicated experiences of conflict and cooperation” and in structural contexts of power.

Refreshments will be served.  Open to the public.  No RSVP is necessary.

Parking: Parking officers DO CHECK weekdays until 11pm. Metered/hourly parking is available on Hopkins Lane, or in the Hopkins Parking Structure (on the corner of Hopkins & Voight Drive).  Campus  parking office: (858) 534-4223.

Campus map: http://maps.ucsd.edu/Acrobat/MainCampus.pdf OR http://www-act.ucsd.edu/maps/

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I am American: Regina Andrews & the Harlem Renaissance

Regina Andrews portrait

Regina Andrews

Join us as Professor Ethelene Whitmire, visiting from the University of Wisconsin – Madison’s School of Library & Information Studies, examines the life of Regina Andrews (1901-1993), the first African American Supervising Librarian in the New York Public Library system. In addition to being a librarian, she was a playwright and key member of the Harlem Renaissance. She began her career in 1923 at the 135th Street branch (now known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture) and ended it with her retirement from the Washington Heights branch in 1967. In From the Modernist Annex: American Women Writers in Museums and Libraries, Karin Roffman states, “Much has been made of the importance of the 135th Street Library in the 1920s to writers and artists in the Harlem Renaissance.” She continues, “This library was a transformed and transforming space. It was a library, but it was also a museum, an experimental theatre, a lecture hall, a community meeting hall, and a work space for writers.” Professor Whitmire will use black feminist theory to investigate the intersections of race, class, and gender in Andrews personal, professional, creative (playwright and actress), and civic lives.

Wednesday, February 2nd, 10:30 – 11:30 am Seuss Room in the Geisel Library building
RSVP http://tinyurl.com/sshlevent

Open to the public.
Refreshments will be served!

Check out the Regina Andrews Digital Story

and the Regina Andrews Project website and blog.

The talk is sponsored by the Social Sciences & Humanities Library and the Librarians Association of UC San Diego.

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A Vampire of One's Own

Can Bella Swan from the Twilight saga be the new Eve? In conjunction with our Guilty Pleasures exhibit, join us as literature professor Lisa Lampert-Weissig examines themes of forbidden desire, free will and equality in the Twilight books, Paradise Lost and Frankenstein.

Tuesday, August 24th
3:00 – 4:30 pm
Seuss Room, Geisel Library building
no RSVP required

Refreshments will be provided!

A Vampire of One's Own

Trash or Treasure?

Check out Professor Lampert-Weissig’s interview on These Days on KPBS–  Why All the Vampires?

Interested in researching vampires in literature? Check out this guide created by Rob Melton, librarian for literature and cultural studies.

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The Holocaust Living History Workshop and more!

Guest Lecture by Dr. Till van Rahden, and Holocaust Living History Workshop training
Sunday, March 1, 2009
Geisel Library

On Sunday March 1, the Judaic Studies Program will host Dr. Till van Rahden of the University of Montreal, as he presents “History in the House of the Hangman: How Postwar Germany Became a Key Site for the Writing of Jewish History.” This lecture will be preceded by a Holocaust Living History Workshop training in Geisel Library’s Seuss Room.

Check out the link below for more information about the lecture and training!
Holocaust Living History Workshop

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