Browse Items (11 total)

  • Tags: 1990s

Often, school authorities manage to cover up alarming events such as violent hate crimes before members of college and university communities realize what has occurred. By now, most of UCSD has heard of the recent confrontation concerning a group of Japanese students and their assailants. Many believe this incident was racially motivated.

Forms of hate crimes against not only Asian Americans, but all ethnic minority groups, have become increasingly common. They occur weekly, if not daily, on several college campuses across the nation. History repeats itself in a cyclical pattern.

In a society which enjoys placing the blame on others in order to avoid taking the responsibility itself, education in the form of ethnic studies can help inform the population of cultural diversity. Differences should not be used as weapons but as tools to build a community where people can live without the fear of violent assault (Fan, 1992).

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1995-UCSD_CCC_Logo_V5.png
The UCSD Cross-Cultural Center (CCC) functions as a campus community center committed to creating space for dialogue while also maintaining an environment conducive to the recruitment and retention of students, staff, and faculty from underrepresented backgrounds (UCSD General Catalog, 2010-2011).

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1995-Affirmative Action image.PNG
After a daylong meeting marked by emotional debate, peaceful protests and political grandstanding, University of California regents took a historic step late Thursday, abolishing race-based preferences in students admissions, hiring and contracting.

The policy change will force UC to stop using "race, religion, gender, color, ethnicity or national origin" as criteria in its admission decisions, beginning Jan. 1, 1997, and in hiring and contracting decisions beginning Jan. 1, 1996.

The vote made UC the first university system in the nation to scale back its affirmative action programs.

An analysis of enrollment statistics by university officials, conducted at the regents' request, indicated that so-called race-neutral admission policies would probably decrease the number of black and Latino students, particularly on the most popular campuses (Wallace & Lesheruc, 1995).

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1992-momentum newspaper snip.PNG
"Be a part of our little servants program." This is what was written on a flyer I [Joanne Tashiro, Editor in Chief of the Momentum] stumbled upon last weekend at a party. A computerized picture of a Klansman was drawn in the foreground. It read as advertising for "Kappa Kappa Kappa" an exclusive caucasian fraternity on campus. I saw this taped to the wall of an Asian American "founding father's" apartment. Well, this turned out to be a hoax mocking the newly formed Asian fraternity at UCSD, Lambda Phi Epsilon. To laugh at a picture of a Klansman is to laugh at the racism, the unjust killings, the discrimination that our previous generations were forced to deal with while trying to defend their Asian American identities. These Lambda officers are betraying the very goals of their cultural fraternity; the goal which is supposed to promote Asian American awareness and sensitivity on campus (Tashiro, 1992).

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1999-Milestones-1.png
Since the beginning of the 1990s, concerned staff, faculty, and student activists sought to establish institutional support for the LGBT campus community and its issues. The Chancellor's Advisory Committee on LGBT issues (CACLGBTI) specifically recommended a staffed Resource Center in correspondences and reports to the Chancellor.On November 8, 1999, Chancellor Robert C. Dynes officially dedicated the LGBT Resource Center for the UCSD campus community (LGBT Resource Center: History).

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1998-Principles of Community 1.jpg
The Principles were developed by the Diversity Leadership Team (comprised of UC San Diego vice chancellors and department directors), and many other members of the UCSD community, including faculty, staff, and students.

The goals of the Principles include:
- Providing fair treatment for faculty, staff, and students
- Encouraging a climate of fairness, cooperation, and
professionalism
- Inclusiveness, respect, and a welcoming environment
- Promoting collaborative attitudes and actions

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1993-TMC Dedication.PNG
Third College is renamed in honor of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, widely recognized for his dedication to civil rights and breaking down barriers to education (UC San Diego Campus Timeline, 1993).

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1992-Guardian story.PNG
On Friday afternoon, more than 400 students from UC San Diego walked out onto Interstate 5 in La Jolla and sat down, blocking all southbound traffic headed for downtown San Diego, according to the California Highway Patrol.

No arrests were made in the two hour sit-in, which ended at 3:30 p.m. when students dispersed after UCSD Chancellor Richard C. Atkinson read a letter addressed to President Bush criticizing the not-guilty verdicts for the four white police officers accused of beating black motorist Rodney King (Gaw, 1992).

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1999-Preuss.jpg
The Preuss School began when a group of UC San Diego faculty [planned] for the best way to increase the number of students in the university who [came] from low income or under-represented groups. Under the leadership of Cecil Lytle, provost of Thurgood Marshall College at the time, the group approached then UC San Diego Chancellor Robert Dynes and requested that a charter school for students in grades 6-12 be built and run by the university.

The Preuss School, which is chartered by the San Diego Unified School District and operated by UC San Diego, opened in 1999 in portable buildings on UC San Diego's Thurgood Marshall campus with 150 students in grades 6-8 (The History of Preuss).

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1991-newspaper snip - women's conference.PNG
[UCSD hosts the UC-wide women's conference, which was] the product of an undergraduate thought group formed . . . to read and discuss the cutting edge of feminist thought on the topic "Women of Color." The common goal was to come up with a conference which could best integrate the many different experiences of women, without privileging the experience of the typical brand of middle class white feminist thought.

The [UC Students Association] decided to allow UCSD to host the annual UCSA Women's Conference because they wanted to show political support for UCSD women. UCSD [was] the only campus in the UC system that [did] not have a university-funded Women's Center (McKay, 1991).

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1996-WC 20 anniversary banner.jpg
In 1973 the Women's Resource Center (WRC) began as a student organization in response to growing concerns by women students that their unique needs were not being identified and addressed by the University.

[It] was finally approved in 1995, and the efforts and hard work of so many were realized on October 14, 1996 when the Women's Center opened its doors, creating a welcoming space that fosters awareness, education and community at UCSD (About: History. Women's Center).

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